HolidaysHoliday gatherings can be difficult for those with hearing loss. Keeping the people you love in the conversation and part of the celebration is one of the most meaningful things you can do this holiday season.

Here are a few tips that will help you prepare for this Holiday Season and make it more enjoyable for you and yours.

As the recent Hurricane Matthew struck the Caribbean and Carolinas, the entire U.S. east coast braced for one of the most intense tropical cyclones in recent history. More often, though, our New Jersey communities suffer from heat waves, extreme cold and droughts.

No matter what kind of emergency occurs, you and your loved ones need to prepare before a disaster hits. It can be difficult, though, if you or your loved one is hard of hearing.

Those with hearing loss may not be able to hear, comprehend and respond as quickly as someone with normal hearing and might require additional preparation time for emergencies.

Phone AppsNoise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is the most common type of hearing loss and, fortunately, also the most preventable. Exposure to loud noise can interfere with your sleep, cause heart problems and permanently damage your hearing.

It is important to monitor the sound levels and avoid dangerous environments whenever possible.

Fotolia 39627729 Subscription XXLWhen presented with noisy situations, consider these tips to help you hear more clearly.

1) In public places, ask to be seated in quiet areas like next to a wall or away from heavy traffic areas. Don’t be shy with your needs. You can also request a quiet area when making your reservation. Find out the hours that are least busy and make plans to visit then.

Brain Hearing

Hearing and speech processing are cognitive processes - they happen in the brain. Hearing loss is a sound processing deficiency that impacts an individual’s capacity for retention and recall.

Oticon takes a “BrainHearing” approach to the development of hearing aid technology.  They have created devices that process and interpret sounds and speech the same way the brain does. In clinical testing, the latest “BrainHearing” device, the Oticon Opn, improved cognition by 30% and retention by 20%.